Chlorine gas a thing of the past! Electrochlorination is NOW!

Chlorination began in the early 1900’s and since then diseases such as dysentery, cholera, and typhoid have significantly decreased to almost 0% in 1950. It was a very impressive discovery with tremendous affects on sociey. Since then, electrochlorination is a newer more updated way to treat drinking water. It does not harm the environment and does not have any by-products like basic chlorination has. It is much safer to handle, is nontoxic, relatively easy to make and is a more natural way to treat drinking water.

Electrochlorination runs an electrical current in salt water to produce hypochlorite. It is considered to be a type of desalination and is a rather simple process. Saltwater is put into electrolyzer cells (after solids are removed). It is then moved through various channels that range in decreasing thickness and are charged with positive and negative low current DC. The reaction is a production of sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen gas, which has between 0.7-1% chlorine. It uses chlorine, a very common drinking water disinfection, in a hypochlorate solution that is dispersed within the system. The hydrogen gas is then removed and the solution is stored. It uses no chemicals!!

Electrochlorination follow this simple equation:

NaCl + H2O + Energy -> NaOCl + H2

Electrochlorination systems are usually used by large water utility companies before the water is pumped to households, but it is becoming more available to smaller populations and there are several installation engineering companies that design specifically for the clients needs .

It has several advantages:

  • Low costs
  • Used worldwide
  • Nontoxic because it is salt based
  • Easy to store
  • Safe to produce
  • Low maintenance
  • Long life cycle
  • Approved as a disinfection from the CDC
  • Reduces scaling because of a lower pH

Disadvantages are:

  • Effects biofilm in hot water pipes and tanks
  • Effect on bacteria is limited in the long term
  • Smell and taste is changed
  • Less effective with pH’s higher than 7.5Image

NOT too bad huh?!

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Fascinating!! Intelligent design, purposeful meaning, interesting aesthetic, and future driven, how buildings should be made.

Fascinating!! Intelligent design, purposeful meaning, interesting aesthetic, and future driven, how buildings should be made.wbrfrontview

WASH-ing everything

It’s been busy over here! I (absolutely) love my job. Basically, it has me doing a lot of the kind of thinking that I want to post about here on H2dayO. As I adjust to the work, (it’s currently exhausting me!) I’ll start to post more.

I’ve been looking a lot at the sustainability of water systems over time from more of a financial stand point than I have been used to. I’m learning a lot. NO FREE WATER PLEASE. I love this website.

There are so many acronyms floating around in the WASH sector (even more than from this summer’s experience with the Navy). I was speaking with someone the other day about “WASH issues” and felt like a lot of a butthead when they had to stop me to ask what WASH stood for (Water Access, Sanitation and Hygiene). I really do not want to further this practice of speaking in wonky, acronym-y terms.

The problem here is that the WASH sector covers so much. You need acronyms when you have such long titles full of words like “sustainability”, “environment” and “water quality”.

On a more national note, I found this fascinating interactive report about opinions of American citizens of the national water crisis (? to be determined if crisis is the correct term).

As I said above, I’ve been thinking more about the financial backgrounds of water access issues. The part of the report that particularly fascinated me was titled “Unaware of Water Cost Drivers”.

Perceived factors:

  • water quality
  • utility company management
  • water use
  • access to water

Real factors (according to the Columbia Water Center):

  • financial factors (labor, debt, infrastructure improvements)
  • rate structure
  • water source
  • service population

Not sure yet if I agree with this assessment.

Feeling wonky in D.C.,

squariel